Particular aspects of the skin in people with spinal cord injury (SCI)

The skin of the disabled body parts is more likely to dry out since the innervation1 of the skin glands does not function properly. Temperature-regulating perspiration is only possible above the paralysis level, although vegetative perspiration may occur, which is triggered by a malfunction in the vegetative nervous system...

People spend between a quarter and a third of their lives in bed; wheelchair users frequently even more. The manner and frequency with which we turn over in bed and change positions vary from one person to the next, as do the requirements for mattresses and storage material. The objective for people with a spinal cord injury is also to sleep with as few materials as possible to hold you in...

What do I need to consider with regard to the shoulders?

The shoulder is the most heavily-strained joint with regard to mobilisation – that applies to sitting up and transferring. It is therefore important to protect the shoulders whenever it is possible, e.g. the patient should never be pulled by his / her arms to help him / her sit up, and should never pull himself / herself up with a...

Principles – Vertebral physiology

The pelvis is the foundation for the spine. The spine can only be brought into a natural posture if the pelvis is in an upright position. The pelvis, spine, line of sight and balance are interrelated and affect each other.

Natural seating position

How the seating position affects everyday activities

The seating position affects all everyday activities...

Old with a youthful spirit

This is an inescapable fact, even if no-one would actually like it to happen: Your hair turns grey, you develop wrinkles, joint pain sets in, you become increasingly forgetful and there is a deterioration in your strength, movement and sight.

Everyone experiences this ageing process and must deal with the consequences, with diminishing independence to a greater or...

What do you think of when you hear the word hobbies? Swimming, skiing, camping, knitting, working in the garden, watching a film or reading a book? Hobbies are very individual. They reflect who we are and what we consider to be important.

Social activities are an important part of our life. The idea of going out in public in a wheelchair can be intimidating at first. Part of your...

During the initial period after rehabilitation, you may tend to stay relatively close to home, only going to familiar places. You will only set your sights further afield with time. Perhaps you have already left the centre during rehabilitation to attend group events or to go out with friends or family and have had your first experiences with public transport and facilities.

Making trips with...

Kerbs, steps, ramps, pavements with a camber and escalators: wheelchair users have to overcome a number of impediments every day. Therefore, it is vital to know the techniques for coping with these obstacles, with and without the assistance of other people. In this section, you will be shown a range of techniques for getting around obstacles and for coping with everyday wheelchair...

The hands are gripping the handrim and propelling the wheels forward with pressure - day by day, year by year. This is the normal way many wheelchair users are usually moving around and half of them are suffering from pain caused by daily mobility. The causes are manifold and it is often unclear what exactly causes it. The research team of the group “Shoulder Health and Mobility" of Swiss...

To perform household tasks can be a big challenge for people with a spinal cord injury (SCI): cooking, doing the dishes and laundry, but also opening packages with only limited arm/hand function. A tetraplegic person with a complete lesion at the level C1-C4 is fully dependent on assisting people. People with a lesion level of C6-C8 can perform certain activities independently, like preparing...